Planting Ginseng

Ginseng seeds
American ginseng, (Panax quinquefolius)

We only have a few wild Ginseng plants at the PGT so I’ve been out planting seeds. Ginseng used to be common but it is so valuable as herbal medicine that it was over harvested. The plant is now rare in most of North America.

I took the picture of the ginseng seeds shown above here at the PGT on August 19th, 2006. And no, I won’t tell you where the plants are!

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4 Responses to Planting Ginseng

  1. This brings back memories. I once was a photographer on a Southern Illinois University Museum project on local herb-gatherers and traditional healers. One fellow in southern Illinois harvested ginseng and kept a portion of the seed to plant in plots in his yard. When the seedlings were ready, he went back into the woods are planted them widely. As I recall, he said he thought he planted ten for every one he harvested, but it’s been a while ago. This was back in the ’80’s and ginseng was getting scarce even then in the Shawnee National Forest.

  2. Jamie Coe says:

    This brings back memories too. Back in the early 80s I was living in the mountains of North Carolina and went out ” senging” with a 70 year old fildeler. After digging a few roots and dutifully planting the seeds, we got turned around on the way back to the truck and didn’t find our way until cold, hungry and way after dark,—– and the roots were lost.

  3. Jamie Coe says:

    This brings back memories too. Back in the early 80s I was living in the mountains of North Carolina and went out ” senging” with a 70 year old fildeler. After digging a few roots and dutifully planting the seeds, we got turned around on the way back to the truck and didn’t find our way until cold, hungry and way after dark,—– and the roots were lost.

  4. Fernando Kelstrom says:

    Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is in the same family, but not genus, as true ginseng. Like ginseng, it is considered to be an adaptogenic herb. The active compounds in Siberian ginseng are eleutherosides, not ginsenosides. *^`’

    Please do look at our own blog site
    http://www.healthmedicine101.comzz

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