Butterfly Walk at the PGT

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail on Liatris

Donna Brunet led about 20 intrepid explorers here at the PGT seeking butterflies, moths, dragonflies, and the latest prairie blooms on a warm August day. It was about the 8th annual Butterfly Walk, and had the most attendees yet. Attendance was boosted by the notice to Missouri Prairie Foundation members along with slightly less hot, humid weather. Donna is creating a new butterfly book that will be published by the Missouri Department of Conservation in 2011. We needed a few clones of her as people spread out along the walk and called “Donna what’s this one?” while another yelled “Donna, what’s that brown spotted one?” a hundred feet up the path. It was a record year for numbers of species seen, though not necessarily for quantities of butterflies.

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About Lorna Domke

Since 1981, I've lived on the land that surrounds, and will eventually be integrated into, the Prairie Garden Trust with my husband, Henry. Our long-term goal is to build on what Henry's parents began and create a nature garden of sorts for others to enjoy. Over the years I've planted prairie, mowed trails, created a website and done whatever I could to enhance what's here. For a few years I served on the board of the Missouri Prairie Foundation. Since I retired from my role as Outreach & Education Division Chief at the Missouri Dept. of Conservation in 2010, I've started to put more time into the PGT. The PGT Nature Garden blog is one result.
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One Response to Butterfly Walk at the PGT

  1. Susan Hazelwood says:

    Birds I identified on this butterfly walk between about 1:00 and 3:30 pm on August 7, 2010 included:
    Turkey Vulture – 2
    Field Sparrow – 5
    Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 4
    Eastern Bluebird – 2
    Summer Tanager – 3
    Northern Cardinal – 8
    Mourning Dove – 4
    Indigo Bunting – 8
    American Goldfinch – 8
    Probably Willow Flycatcher – 1
    Carolina Wren – 1
    Eastern Kingbird – 1
    Barn Swallow – 4

    Interesting that there were so many more species of butterflies identified compared to the number of bird species. It might have had something to do with the time of day and the summer heat! Phew. It was a warm afternoon on a gorgeous piece of prairie landscape. How lucky we were to be able to enjoy it.

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